Ngati kuri whakapapa

Ngati Kuta and Patukeha are descendents of the chiefs who have lived at Te Rawhiti Rakaumangamanga for many generations. We are coastal people who have lived from the sea.

Our community, values, culture and way of life are structured around the fishery and sustainable harvesting. We hold traditional knowledge and practices and now want to exercise those practices in Maunganui Bay to restore the fishery.

The area is pristine in nature, being mostly Maori lands that have remained un-spoilt. The nature, cultural and historic values are special to Maori and it is the desire of Ngati Kuta and Patukeha to keep it that way by putting in necessary protections.

This approach is unique. It relies on the Te Rawhiti community, diver interests and public support to make it happen. It is a Maori-led initiative that relies on the self discipline of individuals to do the right thing.

The aim of the Rahui temporary closure is to enable seriously depleted fish stocks to regenerate. Since the early s Maunganui has suffered from many years of over fishing and needs a chance to rebuild. Evidence is gradual depletion of fish in this bay and Ngati Kuta and Patukeha want to rebuild it back into a healthy state as it used to be.

Traditional fishing practices allowed fishing for certain species at certain times and in certain places.

This kept robust fish stocks available so that enough stock was left to regenerate the species and catchment areas. Ngati Kuta and Patukeha purchased the Canterbury wreck as their commitment to help restore the fishery. Providing an artificial reef and nurturing the growth of juveniles will restore resident fish populations.

It is also a place where unique fish species can be found. Unfortunately some of the public have a different view and see the wreck as an ideal spot to catch more fish. It is the action of a few that has prompted local hapu to place a Rahui over Maunganui Bay. The Rahui will be in place until the 13th October During that time on-going research will be undertaken to measure and monitor the health of the resident fishery.This goes back to the days of one of the Museum's early directors, Thomas Cheeseman, an avid botanist who keenly studied the area.

My mother and I are uri — descendants, and this is an important journey for us both. She left Ngataki at a very young age, but her memories of Ngataki and her cousins are vivid, and her sense of loss runs deep within her core. While traveling from the Waikato to Ngataki we visited places where mum had lived. She told many stories of her childhood and what it was like growing up in the Te Hiku o te Ika — North Cape. This was the very first time we had been on this, our, marae. As we passed through the busy kitchen, the people we met made connections to our whakapapa, and welcomed my mother home when they learned of her story.

For her, this began bridging the years she had longed to feel connected to people and place. It felt extremely healing to be standing on the paepae of our own marae with our whanaunga as we welcomed the manuhiri.

ngati kuri whakapapa

After many years, we are finally tangata whenua. My mother and I standing on our whenua.

ngati kuri whakapapa

There are a variety of physical scientists from around the country as well as representatives from the Far North District Council, New Zealand Police and other institutions. The high level of respect each attendee held for others is easily apparent. Passion for the flora, fauna and the tangata whenua are expressed in many ways. For my mother, whakawhanaungatanga was a little nerve racking. Everyone attending was touched by her statement in some way.

For me, her statement brought me to tears; her loss was my loss - the effects of colonisation are intergenerational. Through her experience, people could better understand why building relationships and moving forward was important collectively and personally.

Convoy of vehicles travelling to Te Hiku o Te Ika. The terrain we travelled to visit the North Cape was rugged and remote.

Ngāti Kurī

Those roads are pretty rough! In the past when we travelled home she would become fearful and lecture whoever was driving about the dangers of travelling Far North roads. Our first stop was Muri Motu. Landmarks were noted along with relevant narratives that expressed our deep relationship with the whenua. They also shared their own personal experiences of growing up and working within the area.

For me, this meant I had a deeper understanding of myself and my connection to this place. I felt extremely honoured and lucky to be standing in a place not many people get to visit.

Looking south from the Muri Motu. She remembered visiting the Money Tree as a child. She said my grandfather used to speak of it often and had taken her to visit the tree on several occasions. Caroline Hempel-Ringham revisiting the Money Tree. It was quite a sight, iwi and scientist alike, bent over searching the ground for taonga.

Here the scientists also shared their knowledge.Marihi Langford. Chief Executive. As chief executive I provide leadership to a dynamic team who provide services to vulnerable at-risk whanau in our community to support them with their wellbeing and to become more independent in our community.

ngati kuri whakapapa

I have worked in the social and health services sector for more than 25 years in particular the areas of mental health, addictions, social services, youth development, kaupapa Maori, and overall Maori empowerment. I returned home in and took on this role with Ngati Kahu. I am passionate about supporting whanau to be the best that they can be.

In my spare time I love to go fishing, spending time on the water and being with my whanau! Elsa Whitley. Community Social Worker Lead. I am one of nine sisters.

Marae puts on DIY coffin building to cut costs

I am a descendant of Te Rarawa and Ngati India. I am of a blended culture, and wonderful exotic foods. Having lived in a Suburban area where playing on the street with the neighbours children was harmless and innocent and just good ole fun. I had chores daily before I went out to play then being called in for dinner which we sat around a table to eat our meal, and golly no one was allowed to waste anything.

ngati kuri whakapapa

This was how I was brought up. Our family had one TV which we sat around and watched together. As you may have figured out already my age, I have raised my children socialising with neighbours, playing games, having fun and being involved in community events. It is not easy mahi, engari I love the mahi that I do and working with an amazing team. Karen Brown. Whanau Ora Team Lead. Kia ora my name is Karen Brown. I have lived in West Auckland all my life and 6 months ago made the decision to move up to Kaitaia after talking about it for many years with my partner.

My partner joined me in the far north 3 weeks ago. We have left in Auckland 4 adult tamariki and 7 mokopuna. I am humbled to have the opportunity to work for Ngati Kahu and support our whanau in the community.

Cory James. Rangatahi Youth Lead. I was raised on my Marae with my grandparents who were actively involved in the revitalisation of Maoritanga through movements such as Te Kohanga Reo, Kura Kaupapa, and politics.Welcome to the Whakapapa Club Forums where you will find a wealth of information.

You are free to browse the forums, but if you wish to comment or add requests, you must registerwhich is quick and easy and you can even use your Facebook Login. Once you have signed up and posted either a reply or a new post it will not appear in the forums until it has been approved — this is to stop spam from appearing and keeping our Whakapapa Club Forums relavent for Whakapapa only. Just wondering who is the main Ngati Kuri Tupuna that Ngati Kuri come from so that a person can say categorically that they are Ngati Kuri from north?

Some of our whanau are now saying that we are Ngati Kuri - never heard that as a child - so am looking for the definitive tupuna. In other words, giving me a name of a tupuna that other iwi also descend from will not help to settle our whanau debate which is why I would like the definitive tupuna!

With that info we can settle the debate one way or the other through whakapapa if we are Ngati Kuri or not. Te Ngake Ngaki is the name of the tribe living here.

This area of the awa Waitononi was named Waitangi the first one as the Kurahaupo hit a rock as it came ashore. The Kurahaupo had already arrived damaged to the kermadecs and most of its people continued their journey to the land in the south on other waka e.

Muriwhenua married Rongokako. I do hold whakapapa relating some Rangatira of Ngati Kuri. Ngati Kuri does whanaungatanga to Nga Puhi ki tonu. As to the other subtribes hapu that carry the name Ngati Kuri in Ngataki, Pawarenga, Kaikoura etc, I have heard there are 5 areas that have a people that are called Ngati Kuri.

However it is the Kuia and Kaumatua of Ngati Kuri in the Far North that are called whenever koiwi is to be returned from within the motu, to bring their koiwi back to their turangawaewae. There is also a map that shows the names of the 5 main tribes of Muriwhenua and the other surrounding tribes. As well as one with all the waka landings that show where they landed in the far north before they continued southward to settle in other parts of the motu. I have tried to post them pics here without succesa but will try again.

Kaupapa Speaker Session Time. We could laugh about Pakeha ways when they decide to infiltrate and administer another lands, if it wasn't so tragic. For example two of the Rangatira had sad ends Since the signing of the Treaty this land was leased to Samuel Yates until his death and then the Keene Family.

The Ngati Kuri are not 'free' to live, plant, harvest or hunt on their tupuna lands for years nearly 6 generations. There are DoCs locked fences that bar access to Ngati Kuri turangawaewae.

Tourists won't have to see the little pockets of Maori settlements in the Far North with their old homemade houses or 60 year old Native Affairs built homes, long drop toilets, unsealed roads, with the nearest supermarket from the furtherest settlement in Te Hapua being kms away in Kaitaia.

To consider the travellers to the area foremost, not those that live in the north and also the spiritual significance of the area for ALL Maori, it is just some planner's 'good idea' on paper which will not transfer well in reality.Te Rerenga Wairua Cape Reinga as of tomorrow morning the gate to the Cape will be locked and closed off to visitors. We are working with the Department of Conservation and NZ Police to ensure all Manuhiri are directed to where they need to be and get the right supports for them.

It is important to be kind and patient with our manuhiri who are far from home and looking for safe haven. Jump to. Sections of this page. Accessibility help. Email or phone Password Forgotten account?

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Pages liked by this Page. Manaaki Solutions Limited. Te Hiku Iwi. Recent post by Page. Those that have asked what our position is on Customery Fishing thi Setting up for workshops on how to help our communities on next phas We will start to call out to our Ahikaa for advice because the level 3 announced is very similar to the current state we are in.

Having more testing and tracking is a false sense of security.The iwi is one of the five Muriwhenua iwi of the far north of the North Island. The iwi is Of the total iwi population, Of the total population 15 years and over, The iwi signed four Deeds to Amend later that year. The following marae meeting places and wharenui meeting houses are affiliated with the iwi as a whole:. As of the New Zealand census The Census showed Iwi members most commonly live in the Auckland Region For women 15 and over, The qualification rate for women However, the employment rate for women The most common job for men is labourer and the most common job for women is professional.

Of women 15 and older, The average number of children born is 2. There are 2, dependent children in the iwi as of From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Redirected from Ngati Kuri.

This article is about the Northland iwi. Stats NZ. Archived from the original on 10 May Retrieved 12 June Retrieved 2 March New Zealand Government. Retrieved 10 September Northern Advocate. Office of Chris Finlayson.Papa Panui Archives. Here are the archives of the old Papa Panui with the data from - We have also added the old forums that are from before the Papa Panui. Archived Records. Type a name in the box below one word for best results.

You cannot add any information to any of these records - they are here for historical purposes only. If you find something you want to know more about post in the current Papa Panui Forum. Ngati Kuri Tupuna?

From the Original Whakapapa Club. Just wondering who is the main Ngati Kuri Tupuna that Ngati Kuri come from so that a person can say categorically that they are Ngati Kuri from north? Some of our whanau are now saying that we are Ngati Kuri - never heard that as a child - so am looking for the definitive tupuna. In other words, giving me a name of a tupuna that other iwi also descend from will not help to settle our whanau debate which is why I would like the definitive tupuna!

With that info we can settle the debate one way or the other through whakapapa if we are Ngati Kuri or not. Te Ngake Ngaki is the name of the tribe living here. This area of the awa Waitononi was named Waitangi the first one as the Kurahaupo hit a rock as it came ashore. The Kurahaupo had already arrived damaged to the kermadecs and most of its people continued their journey to the land in the south on other waka e. Muriwhenua married Rongokako. Ngati Kuri does whanaungatanga to Nga Puhi ki tonu.

As to the other subtribes hapu that carry the name Ngati Kuri in Ngataki, Pawarenga, Kaikoura etc, I have heard there are 5 areas that have a people that are called Ngati Kuri. However it is the Kuia and Kaumatua of Ngati Kuri in the Far North that are called whenever koiwi is to be returned from within the motu, to bring their koiwi back to their turangawaewae.

There is also a map that shows the names of the 5 main tribes of Muriwhenua and the other surrounding tribes. As well as one with all the waka landings that show where they landed in the far north before they continued southward to settle in other parts of the motu. I have tried to post them pics here without succesa but will try again. My strength comes not From one source But from thousands; From my ancestors.

We could laugh about Pakeha ways when they decide to infiltrate and administer another lands, if it wasn't so tragic. For example two of the Rangatira had sad ends Edited by - Nga Hau e Wha on Aug 03 AM My feet are firmly planted on the soil of Taitokerau although my blood ties are from all over the world. Since the signing of the Treaty this land was leased to Samuel Yates until his death and then the Keene Family.

The Ngati Kuri are not 'free' to live, plant, harvest or hunt on their tupuna lands for years nearly 6 generations. There are DoCs locked fences that bar access to Ngati Kuri turangawaewae. Tourists won't have to see the little pockets of Maori settlements in the Far North with their old homemade houses or 60 year old Native Affairs built homes, long drop toilets, unsealed roads, with the nearest supermarket from the furtherest settlement in Te Hapua being kms away in Kaitaia.

To consider the travellers to the area foremost, not those that live in the north and also the spiritual significance of the area for ALL Maori, it is just some planner's 'good idea' on paper which will not transfer well in reality. Who will be employed for the construction obviously there are no local construction firms, so outside tenders with skilled labourwho will work in the Tourist Centre again suitably educated skilled staff.

If there are no shops in the north how would the middle aged or school leavers have the skills? Whilst northern children can attend local Primary Schools but they need to travel to kms each way each day for School. If they manage to complete High School, the closest jobs are also in Kaitaia. There chances for employment are nil if they remain at home and the reality is separation from their homes and families.